Sensory disorders treatment

What are sensory processing difficulties? The term refers to difficulties in handling information taken in by the senses. These difficulties, sometimes referred to as sensory processing disorder or sensory integration disorder, can have a major impact on learning and daily life.

This guide answers basic questions about sensory processing difficulties. You’ll find expert recommendations, strategies to implement at home, and information about the best supports for your child at school.

However, some children seek more sensory stimulation, not less. They want to touch things and feel physical contact and pressure. They may be less sensitive to pain and have an unusually high pain tolerance. That’s why they prefer rough play and don’t understand if they are hurting someone.

What you or your child’s teacher might observe depends on two things. The first is the trigger, the sensory stimulation that overwhelms your child. The second is the type of sensory processing problem your child has.

How are sensory processing disorders classified?

Alterations in sensory processing may be reflected in the following areas: visual, auditory, tactile, vestibular, proprioceptive, oral sensitivity (taste/texture), smell, motor planning, muscle tone and attention.

What is sensory processing disorder?

The term refers to difficulties in handling information taken in by the senses. These difficulties, sometimes referred to as sensory processing disorder or sensory integration disorder, can have a major impact on learning and daily life.

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What are the characteristics of sensory processing?

Sensory processing refers to the way in which the brain is able to input, combine and process sensory information before responding appropriately and adaptively to external stimuli present in the environment.

Sensory processing disorder test

“Sensory processing involves receiving information from both outside and inside our body, organizing and making sense of it, and responding to that processed information. We receive sensory information from our senses, that is, we receive visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory and taste information, but also vestibular and proprioceptive”(Diaz, 2011).

The appropriate processing of the senses allows for the existence of learning skills (see Figure 1) skills such as the ability to concentrate, organize, academic learning, self-confidence, self-control, self-esteem, abstract thinking and reasoning, which allow for purposeful activities such as tasks within the classroom.

The sensory integration theory has two postulates, the first one states that “learning depends on the ability to take in, process, and integrate the sensations of movement and the environment and then use that information to plan and organize behavior, in the performance of daily life activities” (Ayres, 1994) likewise the second postulate allows us to understand that “many individuals who present difficulties in the processing of sensations, also have difficulties in the production of actions, which interferes with learning and behavior”.

What is sensory processing PDF?

Sensory processing is the sustained brain activity that allows us to choose what we want to focus our attention on, allows us to move efficiently, and respond adaptively to our environment. We are in sync with what is happening around us.

What does a child with sensory problems look like?

Children who have sensory difficulties sometimes exhibit extreme behaviors: they scream if their face gets wet or have even violent reactions when you try to dress them, because the physical sensations involved are overwhelming to them.

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What are the stages of the sensory process?

Sensory information reaches the Central Nervous System (CNS) where it is processed through four stages: registration, modulation/regulation, discrimination and integration.

Types of sensory disorders

What are sensory processing difficulties? The term refers to difficulties in handling information taken in by the senses. These difficulties, sometimes referred to as sensory processing disorder or sensory integration disorder, can have a major impact on learning and daily life.

This guide answers basic questions about sensory processing difficulties. You’ll find expert recommendations, strategies to implement at home, and information about the best supports for your child at school.

However, some children seek more sensory stimulation, not less. They want to touch things and feel physical contact and pressure. They may be less sensitive to pain and have an unusually high pain tolerance. That’s why they prefer rough play and don’t understand if they are hurting someone.

What you or your child’s teacher might observe depends on two things. The first is the trigger, the sensory stimulation that overwhelms your child. The second is the type of sensory processing problem your child has.

What mental process results from the sensory data supplied by the senses?

Once this information arrives there, the brain is in charge of organizing, interpreting and giving meaning to it through a process called perception.

Where does the processing of sensory stimuli occur?

The sensory system is part of the nervous system, responsible for processing sensory information. The sensory system consists of sensory receptors and parts of the brain involved in sensory reception.

What happens if the sensory system is damaged?

Having sensory processing difficulties can affect motor skills in different ways. If children are uncomfortable touching things, they may be reluctant to play with and manipulate objects. This can delay the development of some motor skills.

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Sensory disorders

The study identifies, describes and relates the variables of sensory integration, attention and behavior in a probabilistic sample comprised of 66 students between 7-10 years old, 66 parents and 12 teachers from an official school of the municipality of Popayán, Cauca (Colombia).

These school irregularities are described in patterns referenced in the DSM-5 (American Psychiatric Association, 2014), in section II, defined as “attention deficit hyperactivity disorder” (p. 36) and “destructive impulse control and conduct disorders” (p. 261), including oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD) (American Psychiatric Association, 2014). Although with different denomination, it is compatible with the ICD-10 reference (World Health Organization -WHO, 1992; Moreno Oliver, 2001; Moreno García and Meneres Sancho, 2011) and with the patterns of sensory processing regulation disorder, classified in the DC paidopsychiatric guide: 0-3R (Zero to three, 2005, cited in Pérez Robles, 2012).

By Rachel Robison

Rachel Robison is a blogger who collects information on court filings and notices.